Vaccine Monitor Assay

COVID-SeroIndex Bio-Techne To Acquire Quad Technologies

Kantaro Quantitative SARS-CoV-2 IgG Antibody RUO Kit

Powered by R&D Systems
soon available as CE-IVD

The COVID-SeroIndex is a quantitative IgG antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit that enables an objective measurement of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies which is indicative of prior infection. This quantitative ELISA test targets the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, which has been shown in recent studies to correlate with neutralization activity. The target IgG has also been shown to be a more durable indicator of prior infection than IgM or IgA and is first reaching levels that are protective 10-14 days post SARS-CoV-2 infection. This kit is configured and optimized to support research associated with the development of vaccines for COVID-19 by serving as a tool to provide objective performance data during research and development phases.

For Research Use Only. Not for use in diagnostic procedures.
In direct cooperation with Bio-Techne.

Publications

Evidence and Supporting Information

www.sciencemag.org

“Serological assays are essential tools in the management of infectious diseases, including diagnosis of infection, measurements of protective antibody titers upon vaccination, and seroprevalence assessments of immunity in a population.”

www.medrxiv.org

“Antibody responses induced by natural mild-to-moderate SARS-CoV-2 infection are robust, neutralizing and are stable for at least 3 months.”

www.medrxiv.org

“To estimate true infection rates, serosurveys can be used that measure the presence of antibodies that have been mounted to past virus infections, rather than the presence of virus.”

www.medrxiv.org

“These results provide new insights in the evolution of the SARS-CoV-2 antibody response from the acute to the post-infection phase and indicate that the detection of antibody responses against the native trimeric S protein should be implemented to avoid large underestimation of SARS-CoV-2 infections in population-based seroprevalence studies.”